Saturday, February 2, 2013

History In Hartford

 Mansion/storage house.
 Mark Twain House.
 Harriet Beecher Stowe House.
 Mansion/storage house.

 Harriet Beecher Stowe House.

 Mark Twain House.



 Harriet Beecher Stowe Center.



 Mark Twain House.












This holiday break I visited two historical sites right within my state; in fact, right within my county. Although these two historical houses are only about 20 minutes from where I live, I never remember visiting them. And if I ever have from a field trip from school, I certainly didn't remember. However, now that I'm older, I find history fascinating. American history in particular. I find myself exploring the past a lot of times. And not by the requirements of a teacher either. On my own. I think that's a wonderful way to learn. To voluntarily take time out of your own schedule, and not school's, to learn. And since I'm taking U.S. History this year, it gave me an extra background and understanding of who these two famous authors were.

So, the first day I went to The Harriet Beecher Stowe House. I took a tour of the house, which was just lovely. I also took a tour of the mansion next door, which surprisingly enough, was used for storage, even though it was nicer than Harriet's house. In this storage mansion, the house (along with Harriet's) was decorated for Christmas. This added an extra layer of beauty to the already fancy mansion. What I loved was that they had a table set up to make colonial Christmas crafts, such as crackers. To make a cracker, you simply take a toilet paper roll, wrap it in tissue paper, put in some peppermints  and tie the ends with ribbons, and give them as gifts! I made one, and I sneaked a few ribbons in for my hair too. ;)

The second day, I went to The Mark Twain House. And if I thought Harriet's house was nice, that was almost a shack compared to Twain's. THIS was a mansion. It was simply spectacular. The whole house, from top to bottom, was just beautiful. It, as well, was also decorated for Christmas. But even if it wasn't, it would have been just as nice. It had sort of a quaint style, one perfect for a family. And that, he had. Twain had three daughters, so we got to see their room as well. I think that was my favorite. I loved their little rocking chairs, and their dolls and dollhouses. It was so precious and perfect for any little girl even in today's society! My second favorite room was his garden room, which is the circular part of his house that includes the open windows, letting the sun shine all throughout the living room. This room included numerous plants, and it was said that his kids thought of it as a jungle, and when Twain told them stories, he got down on his knees and acted as if he were an elephant or other jungle animal.

Overall, my experience in these two houses was magnificent. They were both tremendously beautiful, I learned a lot, and it was a great way to feel connected to history. I know that I always say I wish I was growing up in the 1960s, but this visit kind of made me want to experience the 1860s! I don't think I'd mind too much if I were growing up in that era!

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